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Yearly Archive2019

This Bass Player’s Tips Could Transform Your Office Culture from Toxic Stress to Sweet Harmony

In his new book, Culture Is the Bass, musician and workplace culture expert Gerald J. Leonard shares seven steps for creating high performing teams that provide a huge competitive advantage.

WILMINGTON, Del., Oct. 3, 2019 /PRNewswire/ — Every day companies fail to compete in the market and grow because of a poor project management culture. Based on his unique perspective as a professional musician, culture change expert and certified portfolio management professional, Gerald J. Leonard has identified seven key principles for achieving the balance, harmony and unified vision many companies lack. He also reveals 11 of the most common mistakes corporations make with their culture with his free online assessment tool.

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Buy-in Is A Team Sport

“People buy into the leader before they buy into the vision.” John C. Maxwell. A key to creating buy-in is to understand human nature. The leader should start with themselves first and then learn the personality of their teammates and followers. 

According to Punit Renjen the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index states that “52 percent of the U.S. workforce characterized themselves as not engaged during the first half of 2012. An additional 18 percent were actively disengaged. Gallup estimates the cost of this divide at $300 billion annually” (Renjen, 2012).

The leader must take time out of their busy schedule and spend time listening and connecting with their people. They must learn to generate hope within their people by including them in the process and co-creating their organization’s strategy, goals, and objectives. People buy-in to what they create.

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Implementing best practices

One of the critical components of implementation is communication. When talking about goals, missions, and other plans, information must be disseminated in a clear and concise way. You need allies that are well informed of what the practices are and why they are important to the organization.

Once key personnel are aware of the best practices, then they must be held accountable for implementing it. It is up to the managers to identify which employees will be responsible for executing the practices. There has to be a plan of accountability that is observable and measurable. It is important to keep everyone accountable for their roles.

A way to ensure accountability is to follow-up. Nothing is worse than creating a practice and not following up to make sure that it is being implemented. Create a plan to assess and evaluate the success of the practices to not only be sure that they are being executed but also to ensure they are effective.

To read the complete article click here.

Voted #44 on the 130 Top Project Management Influencers Of 2019 List

If you want to stay top of the latest in project management and related topics like change management, business strategy, and leadership, make sure you’re following these movers and shakers: the top project management influencers of 2019.