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This Bass Player’s Tips Could Transform Your Office Culture from Toxic Stress to Sweet Harmony

In his new book, Culture Is the Bass, musician and workplace culture expert Gerald J. Leonard shares seven steps for creating high performing teams that provide a huge competitive advantage.

WILMINGTON, Del., Oct. 3, 2019 /PRNewswire/ — Every day companies fail to compete in the market and grow because of a poor project management culture. Based on his unique perspective as a professional musician, culture change expert and certified portfolio management professional, Gerald J. Leonard has identified seven key principles for achieving the balance, harmony and unified vision many companies lack. He also reveals 11 of the most common mistakes corporations make with their culture with his free online assessment tool.

To learn more click here.

Buy-in Is A Team Sport

“People buy into the leader before they buy into the vision.” John C. Maxwell. A key to creating buy-in is to understand human nature. The leader should start with themselves first and then learn the personality of their teammates and followers. 

According to Punit Renjen the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index states that “52 percent of the U.S. workforce characterized themselves as not engaged during the first half of 2012. An additional 18 percent were actively disengaged. Gallup estimates the cost of this divide at $300 billion annually” (Renjen, 2012).

The leader must take time out of their busy schedule and spend time listening and connecting with their people. They must learn to generate hope within their people by including them in the process and co-creating their organization’s strategy, goals, and objectives. People buy-in to what they create.

To read the complete article click here.

Implementing best practices

One of the critical components of implementation is communication. When talking about goals, missions, and other plans, information must be disseminated in a clear and concise way. You need allies that are well informed of what the practices are and why they are important to the organization.

Once key personnel are aware of the best practices, then they must be held accountable for implementing it. It is up to the managers to identify which employees will be responsible for executing the practices. There has to be a plan of accountability that is observable and measurable. It is important to keep everyone accountable for their roles.

A way to ensure accountability is to follow-up. Nothing is worse than creating a practice and not following up to make sure that it is being implemented. Create a plan to assess and evaluate the success of the practices to not only be sure that they are being executed but also to ensure they are effective.

To read the complete article click here.

Voted #44 on the 130 Top Project Management Influencers Of 2019 List

If you want to stay top of the latest in project management and related topics like change management, business strategy, and leadership, make sure you’re following these movers and shakers: the top project management influencers of 2019.

What is business agility?

“Success today requires the agility and drive to constantly rethink, reinvigorate, react, and reinvent.” Bill Gates

Agility involves adopting a new mindset and a new way of thinking. According to the Agile Project Leadership Network being agile includes:
• Being value delivery focused,
• Frequently interacting with the project team and business users,
• Managing uncertainty through iterative implementations,
• Creating an environment where team members can unleash their creativity,
• Where groups hold each other accountable and information is displayed transparently,
• And finally, continuous improvement is made possible through frequent reviews and after-action reviews.

To read the complete article click here.

How Are Projects Programs and Portfolios Different?

As a certified project manager and portfolio manager, I am often asked, what is the difference between project, program and portfolio management? The way I explained it is to use the metaphor of a musical concert series, and it goes like this.

If you are a fan of opera, orchestra music or love a Jazz series program, then this analogy should make sense. When I think of projects, programs and portfolios I think of them in terms of musical concerts. The entire season of musical concerts would be the portfolio, each event or concert in the season would be the program and each song within a concert or program would be a project. So, you would equate a portfolio to a concert series, you would think of the concert event with multiple songs as a program and each song as a project.

To read the complete article click here.

Building a Positive Work Environment

“You can’t just give someone a creativity injection. You have to create an environment for curiosity and a way to encourage people and get the best out of them” (Ken Robinson, n.d.). In other words, building a positive work environment is key.

Different musical organizations have a different vision and purpose. For instance, an orchestra often performs in a hall with a large stage. The women dress in black dresses or black pantsuits, and the men dress in tuxedos. A jazz band may play in a larger auditorium, but often they play in a different environment with a different setup and feel.

To read the complete article click here.

5 Secrets for Strategic Growth

Have you ever gone to a concert and heard a band that you didn’t know performing one of your favorite songs? All the notes are correct, and the singers are singing in tune, but the performance is just okay, it does not move you. Then, you go and hear the same song from a different group, and you immediately rise to your feet and started grooving? The difference is talent plus passion and not talent alone, and that is the secret. In this article, I will share what I believe are the five secrets to strategic growth which are much like listening to a band that makes you want to groove.

 1. Align your organization with its value proposition.

What is your organization’s value proposition? Your value proposition is the promise that you are making to your customers that your products or services will address and meet their needs for the jobs they need to complete, the pains they need to alleviate, and the gains they want to achieve.

To read the complete article click here.

Road Tip

3 Sure Fire Tactics To Align Culture With Strategy To Support Your Changing Business

As a kid, my family loved taking trips to see extended family and friends and more than a few were trips out of state. Growing up in central Florida meant spending lots of time on the road. One thing I remember my father doing, before these trips, was to get the car aligned. I learned later in life that alignment prolonged our tires and created a safer drive to our new destination.

Alignment isn't just for cars; organizations need it too. Follow these steps for your organization before embarking on a journey of change.

Communicate Your Strategy

According to Forbes magazine, “65% of organizations have an agreed-upon strategy but only 14% of employees understand it, and less than 10% of all organizations successfully execute it.”

That's a communication breakdown. The organization’s strategy shouldn’t be a secret.

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